Tag Archives: William’s Syndrome

Disability in order

Countries with institutions on social security are one and the same in considering the following disabilities to be given benefits (in alphabetical order) –

ADHD – Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

Alcohol or Drug Addiction

Allergies

Alopecia areata

Amputation

Anxiety Disorder

Arthritis

Asthma

Autism and Asperger’s

Bipolar Disorder

Burn Injury

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

Celiac disease

Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease

Chronic Migraines

Chronic Pain

Cleft lip and palate

COPD and Emphysema

Coronary Artery Disease

Crohn’s Disease

Crohn’s disease

Cystic fibrosis

Degenerative Disc Disease

Depression

Diabetes

Disorders of the Spine

Dwarfism

Dyscalculia

Eating disorders

Eczema

Endometriosis

Epilepsy

Fetal alcohol syndrome

Fibromyalgia

GERD (Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease)

Gout

Growth hormone deficiency

Hearing Loss

Heart Failure

Hepatitis

High Blood Pressure

HIV/AIDS

Huntington’s disease

Inflammatory bowel disease

Interstitial Cystitis

Irritable Bowel Syndrome

Kidney Failure

Lactose intolerance

Liver Disease

Lupus, or systemic lupus erythmaosus

Lyme Disease

Mono(nucleosis)

Multiple sclerosis (MS)

Muscular dystrophy

Narcolepsy

Neuropathy, Peripheral Neuropathy

Obesity

Obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD)

Organic Mental Disorders (incuding Organic Brain Syndrome)

Panic Attacks

Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS)

Psorias

PTSD, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder

Rheumatoid Arthritis

RSD, or Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy

Ruptured Disc

Schizophrenia

Scleroderma

Scoliosis

Seizure Disorder

Sickle cell anemia

Sleep Apnea

Spina bifida

Spinal cord injury

Stroke (CVA, Cerebrovascular Accident)

Thyroid disease

Tourette syndrome

Traumatic Brain Injury, or TBI

Turner syndrome

Ulcerative Colitis

Ulcerative colitis

Ulcers

Vision Loss

Williams syndrome

There are disabilities, though, that are “invisible.” Examples of these are renal failure, agoraphobia, arachnoiditis, Coeliac Disease, Ehlers Danlos Syndrome, Fructose Malabsorption, Hyperhidrosis, Hypoglycemia, Interstitial Cystitis, Myasthenia Gravis, Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy, Schnitzler’s Syndrome, Scleroderma, Sjagren’s syndrome, Temporomandibular Joint Disorder, and Transverse Myelitis.

It is, thus, necessary, beneficial, and practicable to integrate special education (SPED) in the basic and secondary curriculum of every country.

One doesn’t have to finish grade school and high school first before being given the option to study SPED.

A certain illness could be discovered and considered a disability at any given moment, too.

SPED would be the saying “prevention is better than cure” practiced.

Currently, 19% of the less educated people have disabilities1. Eighty percent of the PWDs, too, live in developing countries2.

Disability rates are significantly higher, too, among the member countries of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) with lower educational attainment.

“We have a responsibility to ensure that every individual has the opportunity to receive a high-quality education, from prekindergarten to elementary and secondary, to special education, to technical and higher education and beyond.” ~ Jim Jeffords

1 Based on the information collated by the United Nations

2 Based on the information collated by the UN Development Programme

 

Video from the YouTube Cannel of Julia Davila

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Sisters of Invention: the challenged pop group

To change the ‘normal’ people’s perception on persons with disabilities (PWDs), five women with learning disabilities formed the first pop girl group in Adelaide.

Aimee, 28, has Williams syndrome. Jackie, 25, has fetal alcohol spectrum disorder. Annika, 28, is blind with a mild intellectual disability. Both Michelle, 24, and Caroline, 29, have cerebral palsy and, like Annika, a mild intellectual disability.

Every track in the 10-song alternative pop album is the girls’ own story. Chaos And Serenity, for one, is about the “mixed messages” Annika would hear at school: her parents believe she could succeed while her principal won’t. Another track, Tsunami Of Kites, is about Jackie’s cousin who committed suicide.

The Sisters of Invention first performed in 2010 after the singers met through the Tutti Arts, a South Australian organization that supports disabled artists. Michelle said the band’s name was derived from the members’ treatment to each other and their mission ‘to change people’s view of people with disabilities.’

“And that’s where The Sisters of Invention differ from what your average listener or viewer might expect of a ‘disabled band’: this is no parade of trite ~inspirational anthems~. Rather, they are top notch pop songs that, like any other artist, deal with the emotional truths of life; it just happens that for these women, that involves living with disabilities (and living with people’s prejudices about those disabilities),” Clem Bastow, broadcaster and music critic currently based in Melbourne, Australia, wrote in her column for the Daily Life.

The Sisters of Invention would perform 20-30 paid gigs every year. The band’s producer, Michael Ross, has been working with them ever since “to get them to the point where their natural musical talents have created broadcast standard records.” Together, they are already preparing for the Sisters of Invention’s upcoming album. The second video, in fact, is already underway and would be shot at the Luna Park in Sydney.

All of members were influenced by Stella Young, a comedian, journalist and disability advocate in Australia. Her humor was the one that spurred them to change their own thinking about disability and in turn to attempt to do the same for their listeners.

“We’re here to challenge people … and just to get the music out there and where we should be.” ~Aimee Crathern

Video permitted to be posted by the ABC News