Tag Archives: TRAP

Chronic Illnesses in Netherlands

In 2002, chronic diseases accounted for 88% of all deaths in the Netherlands.

Back then, overweight and obesity has been the culprit. It was even projected that the prevalence of these health conditions would increase in both men and women over the next 10 years.

But overweight and obesity continued to “soar” in the Netherlands; one in 10 people in the country suffered from the aforementioned diseases in 2012. Type 2 Diabetes1, high blood pressure2, degenerative joint disease, and cardiovascular disease3 were still developed; and anxiety, depression and poor mental health grew more common.

Through advances in technology, however, chronic diseases in the Netherlands could now be controlled. Diabetes could be kept in check through various smartphone applications such as the BG Monitor Diabetes, which can keep a photo log of meals; Diabetes in Check, which can scan barcodes on packaged foods to immediately get their nutrition information; and Diabetic Connect, which make connectivity to the larger diabetes community possible.

Speaking of connectivity, mySugr Diabetes Logbook can track meals necessary for HbA1c reading. Insulin dosages and blood sugar measurements could also be logged in Glucose Buddy and OnTrack Diabetes. Children with this chronic illness could benefit, too, from the “simple and intuitive” interface of the BlueLoop as well as with the games and fun illustrations of Carb Counting with Lenny.

High blood pressure, on the other hand, could be regulated by the sound therapy HIRREMTM (high resolution, relational, resonance-based electroencephalic mirroring) using audible tones to reflect the brain’s pattern of electrical frequencies. Also labeled Brainwave OptimizationTM, the non-invasive neurotechnology can correct neural imbalances of the hemispheres in the brain.

Degenerative joint disease cannot be cured; the pain can only be eased and the swelling reduced. Joints with end-stage disease, however, can be remedied with either arthrodesis (fusion of the joint) or prosthetic joint replacement. UW-Madison researchers have also though of inhibiting the activity of cathepsin K and cathepsin S (TRAP) to nurse the disease somehow.

Incidences of cardiovascular disease can also be lessened with CADence™. It is quick, noninvasive, no-needle, and a zero-radiation test to “look” for Coronary Artery Disease (CAD) risk factors in patients by the sound of blood flow in the coronary arteries.

Anxiety could already be confronted with virtual reality nowadays, too. Depression could be treated with Deep TMS [Deep Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation]4 and poor mental health could be improved with telemental health services.

“It’s the repetition of affirmations that leads to belief. And once that belief becomes a deep conviction, things begin to happen.” -Muhammad Ali

 

Video taken from the YouTube Channel of EU CHRODIS

1Type 2 diabetes causes cells to change, making them resistant to the hormone insulin. Blood sugar cannot be taken up by the cells then, resulting in high blood sugar and for the cells to gradually fail.

2Having a large body size increases blood pressure. Excess fat may also damage the body’s kidneys.

3Excess weight may cause the heart to “work harder” to be able to send blood to all the cells in the body.

4Not unlike the technology in a magnetic resonance imaging, TMS works through a mounted helmet that generates an electrical pulse, too. But the patients cycle through two-second pulses followed by 20 seconds of rest for each sequence—called a “Train”—in this method, and is repeated for about 20 minutes. It should be done daily for about six weeks, followed by a three week tapering off period.

Standard label?

How could the members of the world’s largest minority be known in a variety of names?

The Philippines has officially referred to them as “disabled persons” last July 22, 1991. Section 4 of the Republic Act No. 7277 has defined them as “those suffering from restriction or different abilities, as a result of a mental, physical or sensory impairment, to perform an activity in the manner or within the range considered normal for a human being.”

Fifteen years later, though, the law that was otherwise entitled as the Magna Carta for Disabled Persons was amended and Section 4 of the Republic Act No. 9442 renamed every disabled person in the country as a “person with disability.” The title of Republic Act No. 7277 was changed to the “Magna Carta for Persons with Disability” and all references to “disabled persons” to “persons with disability”.

This must be the reason why Americans with a disability are labelled as “individuals with a disability”; Canadians and Vietnamese with a disability as “people with disabilities”; and Indians with a disability as “persons with disabilities.”

Moldovans with a disability are “invalid,” though—a portrayal that The Rhythmic Arts Project has claimed to “elicit unwanted sympathy, or worse, pity toward individuals with disabilities.” TRAP has further advised to use the terms person with a disability; people with disabilities; has a disability; or have disabilities instead.

If someone is using a wheelchair to move around, describe her as a “wheelchair user.” What some may classify as a “birth defect” or “affliction” is actually a “congenital disability” or “birth anomaly.”

There’s no need to describe someone as “a victim of [the physical condition]” when you can just say “has a [the physical condition]”. It could also be “has had [the physical condition]”; “experienced [the physical condition]”; or “has a disability as a result of [the physical condition].”

A “person with Down Syndrome” is different from a “Down’s person” or “Mongoloid” (the last two terms are simply derogatory). A “person who has epilepsy/people with seizure disorders or epileptic episodes” is also not the same as an “epileptic.”

Those that some in the society claim “the mentally ill,” “crazy,” “psycho,” or “mental case” should just be termed “people who have mental illness” or “person with a mental or emotional disorder.” Those it call “blind-hearing impaired,” “deaf-mute,” or “deaf and dumb” should be identified as “people who are blind,” “visually impaired,” “person who is hard of hearing,” “person who is deaf,” or “the Deaf.” Deafness is a cultural phenomenon and should be capitalized in this particular instance.

“The use of outdated language and words to describe people with disabilities (PWDs) contributes greatly to perpetuating old stereotypes.” ~ The Rhythmic Arts Project

Video taken from the website of the Disability Horizons