Tag Archives: spinal cord injury

Paralysis in Bahamas

Lack of mobility due to paralysis or dismemberment of 21% Bahamian males and 25% Bahamian females has been the most common form of disability in the Bahamas (2010, Department of Statistics). In the United States, about 5.4 million are with it.

Paralysis is the loss of muscle function of the body brought about by stroke, spinal cord injury, and multiple sclerosis. It has no cure but it can be addressed to. There are wheelchairs designed for people with good upper body muscle strength (manual type) and for those with poor upper body muscle strength (electric type).

If it is a limb that has to be improved, however, orthoses are the alternative. They are actually braces, usually made of plastic or metal, that are either designed to transfer force from a functioning wrist to paralyzed fingers (wrist-hand orthoses), to help people with lower limb function move their feet while walking (ankle-foot orthoses), and to stabilize the knee and ankle of people with tetraplegia (knee-ankle-feet orthoses).

Other technologies include the epidural spine stimulation, which can restore movement; brain-computer interfaces (BCIs), which can which link the brain to a computer or an external device, such as a prosthetic limb; and exoskeletons, which can fit onto a person’s head like a swimming cap so that the changes emanating from the brain can be measured in electrical waves.

“Worrying paralyzes progress; prayer, preparation and persistence ensures it.”  ― T.F. Hodge

Video taken from the YouTube Channel of the Doctors’ Circle

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Help in Czech Republic

Established in 2000, the Czech National Disability Council (CNDC) has aimed to advocate, promote and meet the rights, interests, and needs of disabled people in the country, regardless of the type or extent of their impairment. It has collaborated with the state administration and local government at all levels as well as with organizations and institutions working in this field at both the national and regional level.

It is the advisory body of the Governmental Board for People with Disabilities. It is a member of the governing board of the national development programme Mobility for All. It is a member as well of the joint committee for the Programme of Development and Renovation of Public Transport Vehicles, and the two Boards of the Association of Cities and Municipalities.

Aside from those, the CNDC collaborates actively, too, with the Association of Regions of the Czech Republic, the Association of Employers of Disabled People in Czech Republic, and the Trade Union of Employees in Health and Social Service in the Czech Republic.

Comprising it are member organizations, among of which is the ARCUS Cancer Centre that was founded in 1993. It has helped cancer patients and their families since then under the chairmanship of John Koželská, winner of the Olga Havel signatory of the Paris Charter against Cancer.

There are also organizations specifically designed to cater Czechs with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), cystic fibrosis, Charcot-Marie-Tooth, Huntington Disease, chronic diseases, and deafness.

The Czech AIDS Help Society was established in 1989 as a self-support initiative of PLWHIV [people living with HIV]. Through finances from grants, donations, and fees in its own activities, the Czech AIDS Help Society continues to promote HIV prevention and awareness through anonymous and free-of-charge HIV testing; shelter accommodation services to PLWHIV in its own social center, the Dum Svetla (Lighthouse); on-site HIV/AIDS counseling service in Prague and Ostrava; a national toll-free HIV/AIDS hotline; legal assistance to PLWHIV that were discriminated against; and anti-stigmatization campaigns.

The Czech Cystic Fibrosis Organization was founded in 1992 by the parents of the children who has it. Originally, it was called the Club of Parents and Friends of Children Cystic Fibrosis. The parents pass on practical experiences to each other; in early days, the club voluntarily works for several mothers of sick children. It still involved in “active” parents till this day to handle the provision of the patients, and, together with the staff, promote cooperation among the center; inform the public about cystic fibrosis; protect the legitimate interests of the patients; secure funding for the activities of the club; subsidize the necessary equipment;  and support families of CF patients with low incomes financially.

Society CMT, on the other hand, is an association founded in June 1999. Its objective is to defend, promote, and fulfill the interests and needs of those sickened with Charcot – Marie – Tooth, a neurological disorder that affect the nerves outside the brain and spinal cord, in coordination with state and local governments.

Widowed by the American folk singer Woody Guthrie who suffered from Huntington’s Disease, Marjorie founded an association for those with the rare inherited disease as well. It—the Czech Huntington Association—started to set up a self-help organization in May 14, 1991 to “map” the cause of an illness in Bohemia and Moravia characterized by progressive dementia, abnormal posture, and involuntary movements.

To prevent the “diseases of civilization” (e.g. cardiovascular disease, diabetes, asthma, allergy, oncological diseases, epilepsy, multiple sclerosis, severe renal and metabolic diseases, osteoporosis, vertebral diseases, etc.), the Union of Persons Affected by Chronic Diseases in the CR spread its network of 330 organizations in 290 towns and villages in the Czech Republic with its 55,000 members.

Those with hearing impairment, meanwhile, can go to the Czech-Moravian Unity of the Deaf. It was founded in Brno in 1998 and operates in Olomouc, Breclav, Jihlava, Pilsen, and Prague, aside from there. Its aim: unite the other associations for the hearing-impaired in the region to “effectively promote their mutual cooperation.”

This is not to say that Czechs with mental disability are neglected in the country. They are, in fact, encourage to “expand their opportunities in various fields of life” by the Society for Integration of Mentally Disabled Persons (DUHA); “live independently” by the Inclusion Czech Republic; and “take responsibility for their decisions” by the Pohoda (Comfort).

The Association for Complex Care of People with Cerebral Palsy would inform the public everything that has to be learned about the disease. The DEMKA Club would work with the families of PWDs in reacquainting themselves with the rest of the society.

The Czech Paraplegics Association (CZEPA) would protect the rights and interests of people afflicted with spinal cord injury (SCI). The Union for Rehabilitation of Persons with Cerebral Vascular Accidents would look after Czechs sickened with stroke.

Other organizations for PWDs in the country are the Association of Physically Handicapped in the Czech Republic, Association of  Persons with Disabilities and Their Friends, Helping Hand, Home For Me, Assistence O.P.S., Association of Parents and Friends of Handicapped children in the Czech Republic, and Czech Abilympijská Association.

“The only disability in life is a bad attitude.” ~ Scott Hamilton

Video taken from the YouTube Channel of Flux Us

Slipped disks

“Are those inflicted with slipped disks considered as persons with disabilities?” Facebook user Efectos de Jesus had asked.

“Offhand, I’d say no,” I answered. “I have researched on the medical conditions considered as disabilities in the world last year and I don’t remember ‘slipped disk’ on it.”

I also know a slipped disk too well: it was what had caused the death of Mother Rita Barcelo, my alma mater’s foundress. She had an accidental fall that caused the slipped disk in her spine.

“Well, just asking because some are not able to recover,” Mr. JM, as I fondly call him, added. Could it be that he knows one with one?

A slipped disk refers to the “protrusion of a part of an intervertebral disk through the fibrocartilage, causing back pain or sciatica.” In plain speak, it is the pressure felt on the spinal nerves that can lead to pain, numbness, and weakness.

It is also labeled as “herniated disk” and can occur in the lower back (lumbar area) of the spine, neck (cervical) disks, and upper-to-mid-back (thoracic) disks. If in the lower back, either a sharp pain in a part of the leg, hip, or buttocks can be felt or some numbness on the back of the calf or sole of the foot. If in the neck, there could be pain when moving it, the shoulder blade, the upper arm, the forearm, or the fingers.

Some only have to rest for a while to get better. Then painkillers and therapy. Some need to have more treatment: steroid injections or surgery1. Then a long-term back pain.

It could only take several months to a year or more to “go back” once with a slipped disk; those who used to work in jobs that involve heavy lifting need to avoid doing so again. A long-term back pain or leg pain, loss of movement or feeling in the legs or feet, loss of bowel and bladder function, or a permanent spinal cord injury could also occur but rarely.

“Since you cannot do good to all, you are to pay special attention to those who, by the accidents of time, or place, or circumstances, are brought into closer connection with you.” ~ St. Augustine

1 Diskectomy refers to the surgery that removes all or part of a disk.

Video taken from the YouTube Channel of cityllp