Tag Archives: Spina Bifida

Disability in order

Countries with institutions on social security are one and the same in considering the following disabilities to be given benefits (in alphabetical order) –

ADHD – Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

Alcohol or Drug Addiction

Allergies

Alopecia areata

Amputation

Anxiety Disorder

Arthritis

Asthma

Autism and Asperger’s

Bipolar Disorder

Burn Injury

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

Celiac disease

Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease

Chronic Migraines

Chronic Pain

Cleft lip and palate

COPD and Emphysema

Coronary Artery Disease

Crohn’s Disease

Crohn’s disease

Cystic fibrosis

Degenerative Disc Disease

Depression

Diabetes

Disorders of the Spine

Dwarfism

Dyscalculia

Eating disorders

Eczema

Endometriosis

Epilepsy

Fetal alcohol syndrome

Fibromyalgia

GERD (Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease)

Gout

Growth hormone deficiency

Hearing Loss

Heart Failure

Hepatitis

High Blood Pressure

HIV/AIDS

Huntington’s disease

Inflammatory bowel disease

Interstitial Cystitis

Irritable Bowel Syndrome

Kidney Failure

Lactose intolerance

Liver Disease

Lupus, or systemic lupus erythmaosus

Lyme Disease

Mono(nucleosis)

Multiple sclerosis (MS)

Muscular dystrophy

Narcolepsy

Neuropathy, Peripheral Neuropathy

Obesity

Obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD)

Organic Mental Disorders (incuding Organic Brain Syndrome)

Panic Attacks

Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS)

Psorias

PTSD, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder

Rheumatoid Arthritis

RSD, or Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy

Ruptured Disc

Schizophrenia

Scleroderma

Scoliosis

Seizure Disorder

Sickle cell anemia

Sleep Apnea

Spina bifida

Spinal cord injury

Stroke (CVA, Cerebrovascular Accident)

Thyroid disease

Tourette syndrome

Traumatic Brain Injury, or TBI

Turner syndrome

Ulcerative Colitis

Ulcerative colitis

Ulcers

Vision Loss

Williams syndrome

There are disabilities, though, that are “invisible.” Examples of these are renal failure, agoraphobia, arachnoiditis, Coeliac Disease, Ehlers Danlos Syndrome, Fructose Malabsorption, Hyperhidrosis, Hypoglycemia, Interstitial Cystitis, Myasthenia Gravis, Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy, Schnitzler’s Syndrome, Scleroderma, Sjagren’s syndrome, Temporomandibular Joint Disorder, and Transverse Myelitis.

It is, thus, necessary, beneficial, and practicable to integrate special education (SPED) in the basic and secondary curriculum of every country.

One doesn’t have to finish grade school and high school first before being given the option to study SPED.

A certain illness could be discovered and considered a disability at any given moment, too.

SPED would be the saying “prevention is better than cure” practiced.

Currently, 19% of the less educated people have disabilities1. Eighty percent of the PWDs, too, live in developing countries2.

Disability rates are significantly higher, too, among the member countries of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) with lower educational attainment.

“We have a responsibility to ensure that every individual has the opportunity to receive a high-quality education, from prekindergarten to elementary and secondary, to special education, to technical and higher education and beyond.” ~ Jim Jeffords

1 Based on the information collated by the United Nations

2 Based on the information collated by the UN Development Programme

 

Video from the YouTube Cannel of Julia Davila

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Tatyana McFadden: the wheelchair muse

Her mother had enrolled her in various sports activities at 6. Her mother had encouraged her to “try anything.” Her mother had wanted her to be with all of her friends because, she was told, ‘it is only through falling down that one learns to get up.’

Unfortunately, Tatyana McFadden was turned away and sequestered to a corner seat while the other children like her run, swim and climb ropes.” Her school principal and playmates also treated her warily “when all [I] really wanted was to be included.”

Tatyana was born with spina bifida. She spent the first six years of her life in an orphanage without any medical assistance. She couldn’t stand up on her own, much less walk on her feet.

But Tatyana could swim. She could climb a rope faster than most. She could walk on her hands, prompted by an American family who adopted her when she was six years old.

“Throughout my first years the one thing I was often heard saying was ‘ya sama, which, in Russian, literally means, ‘I, myself.’ It was my declaration of independence. It was my battle cry — to try, to do and, as I have found, to succeed,” Tatyana had recounted in the report.

So Tatyana continued to live in Champaign. She is a University of Illinois alumna and has won 11 Paralympic medals, 14 in World Major marathons, and broken 15 world championship titles.

Recently, though, Tatyana has been barred to participate in the Red Bull’s Wings for Life World Run. Its new rules stipulate that participants cannot use racing chairs and must be accompanied by a “support person.”

“However, this change is inadvertently reinforcing the idea that those of us with existing spinal cord injuries are somehow less than whole persons. My injury is permanent. It has resulted in atrophied legs that I will never be able to walk on. That is the reality of how my body works. I accept this. But it does not define who I am. In the course of my life, I have discovered my own talents and abilities within the body that I have been given. I dislike the term disability, it infers I do not have ability or my abilities are somehow less than that of others. On the contrary, I have abilities others don’t,” Tatyana added in the report.

“In addition, by creating one rule for all disabled people Red Bull is perpetuating a stereotype that people with disabilities are all the same and all need assistance — and, by themselves, are not capable of doing something like racing. Instead it should be a person’s right on how they choose to race, be it with a guide runner, prosthetic leg, everyday wheelchair or a racing wheelchair.”

The Red Bull’s Wings for Life World Run aims to “bring focus on disabilities” and “donate 100 percent of the entry fees to spinal cord research.” Tatyana believes that all of us have disabilities. Some are just more visible and debilitating.

“I believe, however, we all have the ability to achieve greatness in our lives — greatness that often comes out of the crucible of adversity. All it takes is strength, stamina, imagination and the support of the people and the society around us.”

“Living with a disability does not limit one’s ability to excel in life. Let’s not let our society, or some element within it, clip our wings.” ~Tatyana McFadden

Video taken from the YouTube Channel of the BPTeamUSA

Of Young Voices

Proving their abilities beyond their physical incapacities are Angelique Vizorro, Brian Semeniego, Carla dela Cruz, and Daisy Panaligan. They are all members of the Young Voices, a global project of a United Kingdom-based health and welfare group that aims to fight work against poverty and social marginalization through film and music.1

Vizorro has been a part of the National Youth Commission (NYC) Government Internship Program that trained high school and college students alike for employment. She had graduated from STI College-Fairview and knew how to encode data, photocopy, scan, and file documents.

Semeniego has headed the YV-Iloilo Chapter and has represented the country in the workshop conducted by the he Leonard Cheshire Disability (LCD) in Colombo, Sri Lanka last August 2010, and in the National Human Rights Forum led by the Presidential Human Rights Committee in April of the same year. He has hosted the radio program K-Forum before he became the youngest board member of the Alyansa ng May Kapansanang Pinoy (AKAP-PINOY). To date, Semeniego intends to promote better accessibility for PWDs through his civil engineering degree.

Dela Cruz has undeveloped lower limbs. Despite of that, though, she was the one sent to Maryland, USA to study one high school year in 2004. She was the one sent to Ethiopia, Africa to attend a video filming workshop and she was the one of those awarded the Women Achiever of the Year last March 25, 2011. She is a cum laude of BS Education, major in Special Education, from the Trinity University of Asia.

Panaligan is an amputee since birth. She is a ballroom dancer as well, albeit on wheels. She is also an athlete and had won two gold medals and one silver medal in the 6th Asean Paragames in Solo, Indonesia.

1 Worldwide, there are 1200 PWD members of YV to date. They are from 21 countries and ages 16-25 years old. In the Philippines, YV is one of the core programs idealized by the LCD Foundation, involved as it was during the drafting of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (UNCRPD).

Video courtesy of the LCD Young Voices