Tag Archives: South Korea

Filipino PWDs in the 2018 Asian Paragames

From winning five silver and five bronze medals during the 2014 Asian Para Games in Incheon, South Korea, the Philippines has upped the ante by winning 10 gold, eight silver, and 11 bronze medals in the 2018 Asian Para Games held in Jakarta, Indonesia from October 6-13.

It ranked the country at 11th place.

The first-ever gold was delivered by Ernie Gawilan during the Para Swimming Men’s 200m Individual Medley SM7, clocking 2:52.43 at the Gelora Bung Karno Aquatic Stadium.

He also bagged a silver during the Para Swimming Men’s 50m Freestyle S7 with a time of 31.93 seconds.

Then it was another silver from Achelle Guion during the 45kg powerlifting, a bronze from Arthus Bucay during the Para Cycling Men’s Time Trial, and another bronze from Gary Bejino during the Para Swimming Men’s 100m Backstroke.

“Our strong performance in the Asian Para Games shows that our disabled athletes can be just as good, if not better, than our abled ones,” Mike Barredo, president of the  Philippine Sports Association for Differently-Abled (PHILSPADA), was quoted as saying in a report.

Below is the list of the winners:

  • GOLD (10)

Kim Ian Chi (bowling, mixed singles TPB10)

Sander Severino (chess, men’s individual standard P1)

Sander Severino (chess, men’s individual rapid P1)

Redor Menandro, Israel Peligro and Arman Subaste (chess, men’s team standard VI – B2/B3)

Henry Roger Lopez, Jasper Rom and Sander Severino (chess, men’s team standard P1)

Henry Roger Lopez, Jasper Rom and Sander Severino (chess, men’s team rapid P1)

Arthus Bucay (cycling, men’s 4,000 meters individual pursuit C5)

Ernie Gawilan (swimming, 100 meter backstroke S7)

Ernie Gawilan (swimming, 200 meters individual medley SM7)

Ernie Gawilan (swimming, 400 meters freestyle S7)

  • SILVER (8)

Kim Ian Chi and Samuel Matias (bowling, mixed doubles TPB10 + TPB10)

Redor Menandro (chess, men’s individual standard VI – B2/B3)

Henry Roger Lopez (chess, men’s individual rapid P1)

Archelle Guion (powerlifting, 45 kilograms)

Gary Bejino (swimming, men’s 200 meters individual medley SM6 5-6)

Ernie Gawilan (swimming, men’s 50 meters freestyle S7)

Ernie Gawilan (swimming, men’s 100 meters freestyle S7)

Josephine Medina (table tennis, women’s singles TT8)

  • BRONZE (11)

Jasper Rom (chess, men’s individual standard P1)

Jasper Rom (chess, men’s individual rapid P1)

Armand Subaste (chess, men’s individual standard VI – B2/B3)

Arman Subaste (chess, men’s individual rapid B2/B3)

Cecilio Bilog, Francis Ching and Rodolfo Sarmiento (chess, men’s team rapid B)

Redor Menandro, Israel Peligro and Arman Subaste (chess, men’s rapid B2/B3)

Taberna Godfrey (cycling, men’s road race C4)

Arthus Bucay (cycling, men’s time trial)

Adeline Ancheta-Dumapong (powerlifting, women’s 86 kilograms)

Gary Bejino (swimming, men’s 100 meters freestyle S6)

Gary Bejino (swimming, 100 meters backstroke)

They will be awarded with a total of P24.3 million cash incentives in pursuant to Republic Act 10699, or the New Incentives Law.

The Philippines has finished fourth among Southeast Asian nations that took part in the meet.

“This is a true testament of our para athletes resiliency, courage and determination in spite of their disablities,” ~ Kiko Diaz

Video taken from the YouTube Channel of Paralympic Games

Advertisements

Turning Four!

Not everyone is still willing to give persons with disabilities a chance four years after The PWD Forum came about.

In Indonesia for instance, disability is still regarded as a punishment from God. PWDs must be exorcised, tied up at the back of the house (dipasung), confined to a small hut in the backyard, or tied at the wrists and ankles to a tree or heavy log. Disability is also seen as a matter of fate so there is little empathy for PWDs for whom ‘nothing can be done’.

As such, PWDs are excluded from most governments’ planning and support. In Bhutan in particular, its educational policy lack inclusive policy guidelines resulting in unequal opportunities.  Taiwan, on the other hand, has only programs for PWDs with “mild” conditions and the curricula just followed what is being taught in preschool classes.

In South Africa, teachers lack skills and knowledge. In South Korea, teachers know no culturally relevant curricula. In Malaysia, teachers are unprepared in terms of emotional acceptance and technical skills.

It is no wonder then that PWDs are still berated when seeking employment or at work; employers would definitely incur costs from hiring PWDs. Educating them alongside non-PWDs  would not be an easy feat especially that the term ‘inclusion’ itself has no fixed definition even in the western countries from which this concept was realized.

There are also parents who do not understand the meaning of inclusive education till now. Thus, the parents are still anxious with their children attending mainstream schools. Even governments are not sure what the concept really means and how it could be relevant within the local context.

If PWDs and non-PWDs study together, though, there would be no need to build exclusive educational institutions. Adjustment may also come naturally. Maricel Apatan had not been a burden anyway when she was studying a two-year course in Hotel and Restaurant Management in Cagayan de Oro City. She was even hired as a pastry chef at the Edsa Shangri-La Hotel in Manila.

A polio victim, Marc Joseph Escora, had managed his training at the Negros Occidental Language and Information Technology Center (NOLITC) in Bacolod City. Blind, Safiya Mundus had graduated from the Eusebio C. Santos Elementary School.

The PWD Forum could just imagine what else could have happened had Arnel Navales Aba, Godfrey Esperanzate Taberna, Emilia Malinowska, Jose Feliciano, and Mohamed Dalo finish school. Townsely Roberts had at The College of the Bahamas with an associate degree in Accounting and Computer Data Processing in 1995. Gary Russell had, too, at the same college with an associate degree in Law and Criminal Justice then at the University of Buckingham for his bachelor’s and master’s.

It was from his blind father that former interior and local government secretary Jesse Robredo learned discipline. Protecting the integrity and honor of one’s family is of highest importance, his father had said, and children are expected to contribute their share in doing that. So Jesse launched the “Fully Abled Nation,” a program seeking to increase the participation of PWDs in the coming 2013 Philippine midterm elections, roughly three months before he died in a plane crash.

“Hopefully, one day, the notion behind “persons with disability” be somehow erased from the world’s vocabulary and usher-in a day when technology, private & public organizations, and the law work together to give each person equal rights and opportunities, regardless of the person’s impediment.” ~ Atty. Mike Gerald C. David

Video taken from the YouTube Channel of Jozelle Tech

Inclusive Education in South Korea

Equal opportunity for the education of every Korean—with disabilities or none—has been assured in the Article 4 of the Framework Act on Education of the country’s constitution.

Under the Korean Ministry of Education and Human Resources Development are divisions responsible for supporting different children groups: the Special Education Policy Division, which is in charge of the inclusion of children with disabilities and children with learning difficulties; the Educational Welfare Policy Division, which oversees matters related to children from low income families, children from North Korean refugee families and children from multi-cultural families; and the Elementary and Secondary Education Policy Division, which devises and implements policies to support children that have low academic achievement levels.

The ministry has also launched a Five-year Education Welfare Plan for Students with Disabilities in 1994. Then four years after, it provided free education to children from low income families aged five, and free computers to the economically underprivileged. The ministry has also supported adolescents who have not been able to continue studies in 2003.

Inclusive education in South Korea was first stipulated in the Special Education Promotion Law in 1978. Under that law, the ministry has to develop instructional material for students and teachers, provide in-service teacher training programs on curricular revision, and support the placement of teacher aides. Education for all students with disabilities should be free and both elementary and middle courses should be compulsory. Only in 2007 was it renamed into the Special Education Law for the Disabled and those with Special Needs to broaden its scope of free and compulsory education from kindergarten through high school as well as free lifelong education programs for adults with disability.

As such, schools in South Korea have to serve all students, regardless of differences among them. Its goal is to maximize the potential of each and every student so there should be no stigmatization attached to any of the children.

“The inclusive class is not difficult in the preschool stage as the learning level is elementary. Starting from middle school, however, nondisabled students prepare for the college entrance exam under the grade-oriented education system… Unless the whole education system that focuses on exams and grades is changed, there is no way for the disabled to be part of the class. The ultimate goal of inclusive education is to embrace and respect the diversity of students, ranging from race, gender to disability.” ~ Kim Chi-hun

Video taken from the YouTube Channel of the Arirang News