Tag Archives: PWD Thoughts

Being SPED-ready

In the Philippines, an educational institution has become “SPED-ready”: the Carmona National High School (CNHS) in Cavite.

“SPED-ready” is a term The PWD Forum will use from now on in describing schools that let students—with disabilities or none—learn together. It was its belief to either integrate special education to the basic and secondary curriculum of the schools in the Philippines or teach sign language. It would help the country’s economy if almost all of its citizens are skilled and, since its population is ageing, everyone is qualified to meet the labor demands of globalization.

So for its part, the CNHS has launched socialization activities that give practical training to PWDs. “Hindi namin itinatago ang mga [estudyanteng may] IDs (intellectual disability) ditto (Here, we do not hide our students with intellectual disabilities),” CNHS principal Teresita Silan was quoted in a report.

It has inspired high school student Bernadette Levardo to hang out instead of tucking herself in. She now aims to be a chef, buy a house, and own a restaurant.

“Through the transition program, Bernadette was trained, she improved her social skills, and it boosted her confidence. I was even amazed she was able to deliver a speech just recently in senior high school,” her teacher, Estie Manguiat, has remarked in the same report.

Integration could allow PWDs and non-PWDs alike to develop their skills and interact independently. Even Student Inclusion Division head Nancy Pascual of the DepEd central office has come to see that development and social adaptation are much faster with interaction.

In CNHS, this is done through a seating arrangement that lets PWDs and non-PWDs sit together. Non-SPED educators are also regularly trained to be sensitive to a PWDs’ needs and pace of learning by the local government’s Persons with Disability Affairs Office (PDAO). The school has forged partnerships with fast food chains and factories in their town, too, to promote employment.

As of now, the Philippines can already boast of schools that are “SPED-ready”. The only thing to work on is an “upgrade” of these educational institutions into learning resource centers (LRCs) to get a mainstream school enroll PWDs.

“Specialized equipment are lodged in the learning resource centers. Any school that has PWD enrollment will be able to access it anytime of the year. This addresses the financial side. Instead of going to SPED schools far from their homes, they could just enroll in the nearest school to their residence, which is not necessarily a SPED center.” ~ Nancy Pascual

Video taken from the YouTube Channel of Rappler

Turning Three!

In its third year, The PWD Forum has continued advocating for the integration of special education to the basic and secondary curriculum of the schools in the Philippines.

It has done so by reporting about how “PWD-friendly” some countries are by discussing the legislations each has in governing its citizens with disabilities (Israel, Netherlands, Czech Republic, Bahamas).

It has also shared the stories of the persons with disabilities from the said countries who didn’t let their disabilities stop them (Mohamed Dalo, Jiří Ježek, Martin Kovář, Běla Hlaváčková, Petra KurkováTownsely Roberts, Gary Russell).

The PWD Forum has enumerated the organizations present in the same countries and described how each has been doing what they can for the PWDs in their midst1 2 3 4. It has listed the disabilities recognized in the world today; discussed which of these is common in Netherlands, Czech Republic, and Bahamas; and introduced a first-of-its-kind summit that happened last February 22-24, 2017.

The PWD Forum still believes in integrating special education to the basic and secondary curriculum of the schools in the Philippines. It would help the country’s economy if almost all of its citizens are skilled and qualified to meet the labor demands of globalization. And since its population is ageing, everyone is very much needed on the labor market. PWDs should then be given chances to contribute to its welfare.

“We have a responsibility to ensure that every individual has the opportunity to receive a high-quality education, from prekindergarten to elementary and secondary, to special education, to technical and higher education and beyond.” ~ Jim Jeffords

Video taken from the YouTube Channel of Lei Pico

1Those in Israel: https://thepwdforum.wordpress.com/2016/09/16/help-in-israel/

2Those in Netherlands: https://thepwdforum.wordpress.com/2016/10/28/help-in-netherlands/

3Those in Czech Republic: https://thepwdforum.wordpress.com/2017/01/13/help-in-czech-republic/

4Those in Bahamas: https://thepwdforum.wordpress.com/2017/04/07/help-in-bahamas/

5http://www.tribune242.com/news/2015/dec/02/why-its-so-important-end-disability-discrimination/

PWD Complaints

In the Philippines, persons with disability can only avail of one discount scheme: the promo discount or the discount mandated by the Republic Act 9442.

“There is also another law that exempt PWD discount from value added tax, which is Republic Act 10754,” explained Carmen Reyes Zubiaga, acting executive director of the National Council on Disability Affairs, in an email.

“Value added [tax] is only 12%. The computation should be as follows—VAT inclusive Retail Price less 12% VAT and less 20% discount,” she added.

This goes without saying that if a good or service has already excluded the value-added tax from the cost, a PWD can still avail of the promo discount and/or the PWD discount provided that the price of goods or service in promo is entitled to the value added tax.

“For the availment of discount instead of promo, you have to ask the regular price of the procedure. However, you also have to check if the discounted price [already] includes VAT (if the product is VATable). Also, look for proof that the product is discounted (public announcement, fliers, approval of DTI and other approving entities).”

For further inquiries about the discounts and privileges of PWDs in the Philippines, Dir. Zubiaga advised to visit the NCDA.

“The worst thing about a disability is that people see it before they see you.” ~ Easter Seals

Video taken from the YouTube Channel of Julia Davila

 

On Inclusivity

The thought of people–with disabilities or none–learning together excites The PWD Forum more than ever!

The idea, which was initiated by The Teacher’s Gallery, would be discussed in a conference next year. Its another purpose is to bring together teachers, education administrators, advocates, businesses and politicians for the first time for this purpose.

“We are people like them and that with the right support, we are capable of learning and bettering ourselves and contributing to society just like persons without disabilities,” shared Benjamin Almeda-Lopez, special project officer of The Teacher’s Gallery, in an email.

For all those good intentions, however, The PWD Forum still would rather wait if inclusive education would result in a just society for PWDs and non-PWDs alike.

“There are many benefits to inclusion of students with disabilities in ‘normal’ schools,” Almeda-Lopez added. “For one, the students without disabilities are able to interact with PWDs on a daily basis.”

This interaction, if successful, can help PWDs—particularly the children—develop greater belief in themselves, Almeda-Lopez further argued. Every Filipino would have the same opportunities, too, preventing “alienating and disadvantaging PWD students socially, academically and emotionally.”

But this would just give “normal” people a reason to feel that they’re better that their counterparts. Worse, the former may also think that they are just handing favors to PWDs that are in their school.

The PWD Forum is pushing for the integration of special education in the basic and secondary curriculum in the country. It has reiterated that after The PWD Forum turned one in the blogosphere and even after it turned two. The PWD Forum has also made a case on the necessity, benefit, and practicality of sign language if only it is taught to every one.

“We have a responsibility to ensure that every individual has the opportunity to receive a high-quality education, from prekindergarten to elementary and secondary, to special education, to technical and higher education and beyond.” ~ Jim Jeffords

Video taken from the YouTube Channel of teach.org

Disability in order

Countries with institutions on social security are one and the same in considering the following disabilities to be given benefits (in alphabetical order) –

ADHD – Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

Alcohol or Drug Addiction

Allergies

Alopecia areata

Amputation

Anxiety Disorder

Arthritis

Asthma

Autism and Asperger’s

Bipolar Disorder

Burn Injury

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

Celiac disease

Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease

Chronic Migraines

Chronic Pain

Cleft lip and palate

COPD and Emphysema

Coronary Artery Disease

Crohn’s Disease

Crohn’s disease

Cystic fibrosis

Degenerative Disc Disease

Depression

Diabetes

Disorders of the Spine

Dwarfism

Dyscalculia

Eating disorders

Eczema

Endometriosis

Epilepsy

Fetal alcohol syndrome

Fibromyalgia

GERD (Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease)

Gout

Growth hormone deficiency

Hearing Loss

Heart Failure

Hepatitis

High Blood Pressure

HIV/AIDS

Huntington’s disease

Inflammatory bowel disease

Interstitial Cystitis

Irritable Bowel Syndrome

Kidney Failure

Lactose intolerance

Liver Disease

Lupus, or systemic lupus erythmaosus

Lyme Disease

Mono(nucleosis)

Multiple sclerosis (MS)

Muscular dystrophy

Narcolepsy

Neuropathy, Peripheral Neuropathy

Obesity

Obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD)

Organic Mental Disorders (incuding Organic Brain Syndrome)

Panic Attacks

Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS)

Psorias

PTSD, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder

Rheumatoid Arthritis

RSD, or Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy

Ruptured Disc

Schizophrenia

Scleroderma

Scoliosis

Seizure Disorder

Sickle cell anemia

Sleep Apnea

Spina bifida

Spinal cord injury

Stroke (CVA, Cerebrovascular Accident)

Thyroid disease

Tourette syndrome

Traumatic Brain Injury, or TBI

Turner syndrome

Ulcerative Colitis

Ulcerative colitis

Ulcers

Vision Loss

Williams syndrome

There are disabilities, though, that are “invisible.” Examples of these are renal failure, agoraphobia, arachnoiditis, Coeliac Disease, Ehlers Danlos Syndrome, Fructose Malabsorption, Hyperhidrosis, Hypoglycemia, Interstitial Cystitis, Myasthenia Gravis, Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy, Schnitzler’s Syndrome, Scleroderma, Sjagren’s syndrome, Temporomandibular Joint Disorder, and Transverse Myelitis.

It is, thus, necessary, beneficial, and practicable to integrate special education (SPED) in the basic and secondary curriculum of every country.

One doesn’t have to finish grade school and high school first before being given the option to study SPED.

A certain illness could be discovered and considered a disability at any given moment, too.

SPED would be the saying “prevention is better than cure” practiced.

Currently, 19% of the less educated people have disabilities1. Eighty percent of the PWDs, too, live in developing countries2.

Disability rates are significantly higher, too, among the member countries of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) with lower educational attainment.

“We have a responsibility to ensure that every individual has the opportunity to receive a high-quality education, from prekindergarten to elementary and secondary, to special education, to technical and higher education and beyond.” ~ Jim Jeffords

1 Based on the information collated by the United Nations

2 Based on the information collated by the UN Development Programme

 

Video from the YouTube Cannel of Julia Davila

Slipped disks

“Are those inflicted with slipped disks considered as persons with disabilities?” Facebook user Efectos de Jesus had asked.

“Offhand, I’d say no,” I answered. “I have researched on the medical conditions considered as disabilities in the world last year and I don’t remember ‘slipped disk’ on it.”

I also know a slipped disk too well: it was what had caused the death of Mother Rita Barcelo, my alma mater’s foundress. She had an accidental fall that caused the slipped disk in her spine.

“Well, just asking because some are not able to recover,” Mr. JM, as I fondly call him, added. Could it be that he knows one with one?

A slipped disk refers to the “protrusion of a part of an intervertebral disk through the fibrocartilage, causing back pain or sciatica.” In plain speak, it is the pressure felt on the spinal nerves that can lead to pain, numbness, and weakness.

It is also labeled as “herniated disk” and can occur in the lower back (lumbar area) of the spine, neck (cervical) disks, and upper-to-mid-back (thoracic) disks. If in the lower back, either a sharp pain in a part of the leg, hip, or buttocks can be felt or some numbness on the back of the calf or sole of the foot. If in the neck, there could be pain when moving it, the shoulder blade, the upper arm, the forearm, or the fingers.

Some only have to rest for a while to get better. Then painkillers and therapy. Some need to have more treatment: steroid injections or surgery1. Then a long-term back pain.

It could only take several months to a year or more to “go back” once with a slipped disk; those who used to work in jobs that involve heavy lifting need to avoid doing so again. A long-term back pain or leg pain, loss of movement or feeling in the legs or feet, loss of bowel and bladder function, or a permanent spinal cord injury could also occur but rarely.

“Since you cannot do good to all, you are to pay special attention to those who, by the accidents of time, or place, or circumstances, are brought into closer connection with you.” ~ St. Augustine

1 Diskectomy refers to the surgery that removes all or part of a disk.

Video taken from the YouTube Channel of cityllp