Tag Archives: Netherlands

Turning Three!

In its third year, The PWD Forum has continued advocating for the integration of special education to the basic and secondary curriculum of the schools in the Philippines.

It has done so by reporting about how “PWD-friendly” some countries are by discussing the legislations each has in governing its citizens with disabilities (Israel, Netherlands, Czech Republic, Bahamas).

It has also shared the stories of the persons with disabilities from the said countries who didn’t let their disabilities stop them (Mohamed Dalo, Jiří Ježek, Martin Kovář, Běla Hlaváčková, Petra KurkováTownsely Roberts, Gary Russell).

The PWD Forum has enumerated the organizations present in the same countries and described how each has been doing what they can for the PWDs in their midst1 2 3 4. It has listed the disabilities recognized in the world today; discussed which of these is common in Netherlands, Czech Republic, and Bahamas; and introduced a first-of-its-kind summit that happened last February 22-24, 2017.

The PWD Forum still believes in integrating special education to the basic and secondary curriculum of the schools in the Philippines. It would help the country’s economy if almost all of its citizens are skilled and qualified to meet the labor demands of globalization. And since its population is ageing, everyone is very much needed on the labor market. PWDs should then be given chances to contribute to its welfare.

“We have a responsibility to ensure that every individual has the opportunity to receive a high-quality education, from prekindergarten to elementary and secondary, to special education, to technical and higher education and beyond.” ~ Jim Jeffords

Video taken from the YouTube Channel of Lei Pico

1Those in Israel: https://thepwdforum.wordpress.com/2016/09/16/help-in-israel/

2Those in Netherlands: https://thepwdforum.wordpress.com/2016/10/28/help-in-netherlands/

3Those in Czech Republic: https://thepwdforum.wordpress.com/2017/01/13/help-in-czech-republic/

4Those in Bahamas: https://thepwdforum.wordpress.com/2017/04/07/help-in-bahamas/

5http://www.tribune242.com/news/2015/dec/02/why-its-so-important-end-disability-discrimination/

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Chronic Illnesses in Netherlands

In 2002, chronic diseases accounted for 88% of all deaths in the Netherlands.

Back then, overweight and obesity has been the culprit. It was even projected that the prevalence of these health conditions would increase in both men and women over the next 10 years.

But overweight and obesity continued to “soar” in the Netherlands; one in 10 people in the country suffered from the aforementioned diseases in 2012. Type 2 Diabetes1, high blood pressure2, degenerative joint disease, and cardiovascular disease3 were still developed; and anxiety, depression and poor mental health grew more common.

Through advances in technology, however, chronic diseases in the Netherlands could now be controlled. Diabetes could be kept in check through various smartphone applications such as the BG Monitor Diabetes, which can keep a photo log of meals; Diabetes in Check, which can scan barcodes on packaged foods to immediately get their nutrition information; and Diabetic Connect, which make connectivity to the larger diabetes community possible.

Speaking of connectivity, mySugr Diabetes Logbook can track meals necessary for HbA1c reading. Insulin dosages and blood sugar measurements could also be logged in Glucose Buddy and OnTrack Diabetes. Children with this chronic illness could benefit, too, from the “simple and intuitive” interface of the BlueLoop as well as with the games and fun illustrations of Carb Counting with Lenny.

High blood pressure, on the other hand, could be regulated by the sound therapy HIRREMTM (high resolution, relational, resonance-based electroencephalic mirroring) using audible tones to reflect the brain’s pattern of electrical frequencies. Also labeled Brainwave OptimizationTM, the non-invasive neurotechnology can correct neural imbalances of the hemispheres in the brain.

Degenerative joint disease cannot be cured; the pain can only be eased and the swelling reduced. Joints with end-stage disease, however, can be remedied with either arthrodesis (fusion of the joint) or prosthetic joint replacement. UW-Madison researchers have also though of inhibiting the activity of cathepsin K and cathepsin S (TRAP) to nurse the disease somehow.

Incidences of cardiovascular disease can also be lessened with CADence™. It is quick, noninvasive, no-needle, and a zero-radiation test to “look” for Coronary Artery Disease (CAD) risk factors in patients by the sound of blood flow in the coronary arteries.

Anxiety could already be confronted with virtual reality nowadays, too. Depression could be treated with Deep TMS [Deep Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation]4 and poor mental health could be improved with telemental health services.

“It’s the repetition of affirmations that leads to belief. And once that belief becomes a deep conviction, things begin to happen.” -Muhammad Ali

 

Video taken from the YouTube Channel of EU CHRODIS

1Type 2 diabetes causes cells to change, making them resistant to the hormone insulin. Blood sugar cannot be taken up by the cells then, resulting in high blood sugar and for the cells to gradually fail.

2Having a large body size increases blood pressure. Excess fat may also damage the body’s kidneys.

3Excess weight may cause the heart to “work harder” to be able to send blood to all the cells in the body.

4Not unlike the technology in a magnetic resonance imaging, TMS works through a mounted helmet that generates an electrical pulse, too. But the patients cycle through two-second pulses followed by 20 seconds of rest for each sequence—called a “Train”—in this method, and is repeated for about 20 minutes. It should be done daily for about six weeks, followed by a three week tapering off period.

Help in Netherlands

Twelve organizations in the Netherlands have been taking care of persons with disabilities (PWDs) in the country since the 90s.

The first was the Soft Tulip Foundation in 1991. It aimed to deliver rehabilitation to multiple disabled children, elderly, people with mental health problems, and people with learning disabilities.

The next year, the European Co-operation in Anthroposophical Curative Education and Social Therapy (ECCE) has engaged about 400 parents’ associations, professional organisations and centres for vocational training. It believed that “all human beings have the right to offer their contribution to society through work.”

For those afflicted with spinal cord injury, the Dutch-Flemish Paraplegia Society (NVDG), was created in 1993 to (1) encourage cooperation between individuals, (2) engage in spinal cord injury rehabilitation in the Netherlands and Flanders, (3) exchange ideas and experiences with people from other countries who deal with spinal cord injury rehabilitation; and (4) know more scientific work on spinal cord injury rehabilitation.

Representation of the poor PWDs in the world had been the goal in mind of the Dutch Coalition on Disability and Development when it was formed in 2001. It had a “twin-track approach” then to strengthen the position of people with disabilities in Southern countries: point mainstream development organisations toward incorporating PWDs in their development programmes and policies on one hand, and (2) call for specific support for some persons with disabilities through policy development on the other. Both were envisioned so PWDs in the country will be fully included on an equal basis with others.

Six years after, The Coalition for Inclusion was established for people with mental, physical or mental disability as well as the elderly who are experiencing temporary or long-term restrictions. It wished to promote an inclusive society.

Other organizations for PWDs in the Netherlands are Dedicon, Everyone in, Dutch Association of Healthcare Providers for People with Disabilities (De Vereniging Gehandicaptenzorg Nederland), Jopla, Visio, Karuna Foundation, and MEE NL .

“If I regarded my life from the point of view of the pessimist, I should be undone. I should seek in vain for the light that does not visit my eyes and the music that does not ring in my ears. I should beg night and day and never be satisfied. I should sit apart in awful solitude, a prey to fear and despair. But since I consider it a duty to myself and to others to be happy, I escape a misery worse than any physical deprivation.” – Helen Keller

Video taken from the YouTube Channel of Brian Calligy

Netherlands

Change has already come in The Netherlands.

The social security system in this country is designed to encourage persons with disabilities (PWDs) here to keep working and earn their keep. As a result, disability rates have gone down from 100,000 in 2000 to 21,000 in 2006. The disability risk has decreased, too: from 1.55 in 2000 to 0.46 in 2006.

Employers, on the other hand, are required to monitor their sick employees’ sick leave; hold a sick worker’s job open for two years; develop, finance, and implement plans for rehabilitation; pay for certain medical treatments; make workplace accommodations; and find new jobs for the workers they no longer have a commensurable employment to give. They must contract with private companies in fulfilling these tasks in exchange of incentives a “differentiated system of contributions” will bring.

Article 1 of the Dutch Constitution prohibits discrimination on any grounds. So The Netherlands has taken precautionary measures to curb unnecessary medical treatment. It has invested and improved the cooperation of the occupational safety and health care providers and the medical care providers to, in effect, prevent work-related health conditions and promote reintegration.

Stipulated on December 1, 2003, the Act on Equal Treatment of the Disabled and Chronically Ill People has banned making distinctions in the recruitment of people in the country, may they be with disabilities or not. The law also gives disabled people the right to the adaptations necessary to enable them to participate fully in society.

Care, support, and treatment for PWDs here are funded through public health insurance1. Accessibility is also mandated2 and “special benefits” are given3. PWDs here have also somewhere to go to if they need help in re-entering the job market4.

The Netherlands is also “efficient” in screening “applicants’ to avoid providing benefits to healthy recipients and denying benefits to unhealthy applicants5. A citizen can only be marked as “fully disabled” if their impairments are terminal, if their “theoretical loss of income” is greater than 80%, if they require institutionalization, or if they are already in “steep decline”6.

“When you hear the word ‘disabled,’ people immediately think about people who can’t walk or talk or do everything that people take for granted. Now, I take nothing for granted. But I find the real disability is people who can’t find joy in life and are bitter.” ~ Teri Garr

Video taken from the YouTube Channel of Kanaal van Ambassadeur2009 

1Exceptional Medical Expenses Act (AWBZ)

2Act on Facilities for the Disabled

3Disablement Benefits Act (WAO); Self-Employed Persons Disablement Benefits Act (WAZ); Disablement Assistance Act for Handicapped Young Persons (WAJONG)

4Disability Reintegration Act (REA)

5Source: Enrica Croda, Jonathan Skinner, and Laura Yasaitis, “An International Comparison of the Efficiency of Government Disability Programs” (Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research, 2013), pp. 1, 29

6Source: “Work and Income According to the Labor Capacity Act,” Dutch Social Insurance Institute (WIA), May 11, 2015, and personal correspondence with Carla van Deaursen, senior advisor, UWV, May 18, 2015