Tag Archives: muscular dystrophy

Disability in order

Countries with institutions on social security are one and the same in considering the following disabilities to be given benefits (in alphabetical order) –

ADHD – Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

Alcohol or Drug Addiction

Allergies

Alopecia areata

Amputation

Anxiety Disorder

Arthritis

Asthma

Autism and Asperger’s

Bipolar Disorder

Burn Injury

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

Celiac disease

Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease

Chronic Migraines

Chronic Pain

Cleft lip and palate

COPD and Emphysema

Coronary Artery Disease

Crohn’s Disease

Crohn’s disease

Cystic fibrosis

Degenerative Disc Disease

Depression

Diabetes

Disorders of the Spine

Dwarfism

Dyscalculia

Eating disorders

Eczema

Endometriosis

Epilepsy

Fetal alcohol syndrome

Fibromyalgia

GERD (Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease)

Gout

Growth hormone deficiency

Hearing Loss

Heart Failure

Hepatitis

High Blood Pressure

HIV/AIDS

Huntington’s disease

Inflammatory bowel disease

Interstitial Cystitis

Irritable Bowel Syndrome

Kidney Failure

Lactose intolerance

Liver Disease

Lupus, or systemic lupus erythmaosus

Lyme Disease

Mono(nucleosis)

Multiple sclerosis (MS)

Muscular dystrophy

Narcolepsy

Neuropathy, Peripheral Neuropathy

Obesity

Obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD)

Organic Mental Disorders (incuding Organic Brain Syndrome)

Panic Attacks

Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS)

Psorias

PTSD, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder

Rheumatoid Arthritis

RSD, or Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy

Ruptured Disc

Schizophrenia

Scleroderma

Scoliosis

Seizure Disorder

Sickle cell anemia

Sleep Apnea

Spina bifida

Spinal cord injury

Stroke (CVA, Cerebrovascular Accident)

Thyroid disease

Tourette syndrome

Traumatic Brain Injury, or TBI

Turner syndrome

Ulcerative Colitis

Ulcerative colitis

Ulcers

Vision Loss

Williams syndrome

There are disabilities, though, that are “invisible.” Examples of these are renal failure, agoraphobia, arachnoiditis, Coeliac Disease, Ehlers Danlos Syndrome, Fructose Malabsorption, Hyperhidrosis, Hypoglycemia, Interstitial Cystitis, Myasthenia Gravis, Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy, Schnitzler’s Syndrome, Scleroderma, Sjagren’s syndrome, Temporomandibular Joint Disorder, and Transverse Myelitis.

It is, thus, necessary, beneficial, and practicable to integrate special education (SPED) in the basic and secondary curriculum of every country.

One doesn’t have to finish grade school and high school first before being given the option to study SPED.

A certain illness could be discovered and considered a disability at any given moment, too.

SPED would be the saying “prevention is better than cure” practiced.

Currently, 19% of the less educated people have disabilities1. Eighty percent of the PWDs, too, live in developing countries2.

Disability rates are significantly higher, too, among the member countries of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) with lower educational attainment.

“We have a responsibility to ensure that every individual has the opportunity to receive a high-quality education, from prekindergarten to elementary and secondary, to special education, to technical and higher education and beyond.” ~ Jim Jeffords

1 Based on the information collated by the United Nations

2 Based on the information collated by the UN Development Programme

 

Video from the YouTube Cannel of Julia Davila

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Mohamed Dalo: the crippled anime artist

It could be luck or just pure circumstance why a 21-year-old Palestinian was able to open an art exhibition in Gaza.

“You draw whatever your imagination leads you to without adhering to any specific shaping or the general appearance of the drawing. I only have my A4 drawing pad and pencils that enable me to live out my dream,” Mohamed Dalo was quoted saying in a report. He has muscular dystrophy.

Muscular dystrophy is a nutritional deficiency disease. It commonly occurs in boys during childhood and could result in an inability to walk or difficulty in breathing or swallowing. Only medications and therapy can “cure” muscular dystrophy by managing its symptoms and slowing its course.

But Mohamed Dalo was still able to “mix with people of various abilities.” “Since I was a toddler, art was a hobby that grew into a passion which knew no boundaries,” Mohamed had added.

A “daily life is a struggle for survival and progression,” however. Before Mohamed had the chance to complete his baccalaureate exams, his health and condition deteriorated to the extent that he could no longer endure a “long and tiring school day.” He left school and solely embark on a journey toward his dream.

Alone, Mohamed got inspired by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, Frida Kahlo, Claude Monet, Vincent van Gogh, Al Capp, Picasso, Da Vinci, and Japanese anime artists Naoki Tate and Masashi Kishimoto. He eventually got more fascinated with anime—a style of animation developed in Japan—because, unlike other forms of art, Mohamed found anime to be without boundaries.

Gradually, Mohamed began showing his work to others; initially on social media then to friends and family. During an art exhibition at two local events in Gaza, including the “Renewing Contribution” festival at Gaza College, Mohamed’s works were displayed.

Soon afterwards, Mohamed attracted media attention. Palestinian, Iraqi and Jordanian newspapers and TV channels all vied to interview him. The only struggle he had left is not his physical disability but his living in Gaza.

“Living in Gaza is a real challenge for any individual but if you are disabled then it is an entirely different matter; the siege which limits the everyday life of every Palestinian in the Strip, also means those with disabilities are unable to get access to, or learn about, opportunities and facilities that are available for people with special needs.”

Mohamed remains hopeful, though: “I want to leave a mark in the world of art, travel and see what is out there in terms of art, especially anime, open my own exhibition where people from all over the globe can come and view my work and improve my skills through interacting and meeting artists and academics who may help me nurture this talent through further studies.”

Mohamed had his first solo exhibition in Gaza last year entitled “Anime is my Life” at the Arts and Crafts Village.

“Don’t hide or suppress your talent. Nothing is impossible. Be proud of who you are and what you contribute to society. People with disability have a vital role to play in shaping the world and influencing the attitude and perception others have of disability.” ~Mohamed Dalo

Serbia in style

His art is not only ‘for the disabled’. He was just not able to exhibit his works for almost 12 years because he had acquired progressive multiple sclerosis when he was just about to start studying his masters at the University of Arts. He is Darko Babic, a 46-year-old painter from Pozega, Serbia.

As passionate as him is Jelena Jakonic, a 28-year-old woman struck by a subdural hemorrhage during her birth. It caused an atrophy on the optic nerve of her eye so she is almost totally blind. She is mildly retarded yet still “sees the world in colours and not in shape.”

Even though suffering from a form of muscular dystrophy, Milesa Milenkovic has persisted to author the documentaries “Between the lines” and “Moment of Joy” (2014). She is the current director of the festival, “Uhvati samnom ovaj dan” (“Seize this day with me”) and is completing a doctorate at the University of Novi Sad Center for Gender Studies at the present.

“It was strange and insidious. One day I would be able to work but the next day not. I would tire quickly for reasons that were unknown to me at that point,” Babic has been quoted saying in a report in Balkan Insight. He has just enrolled for a master’s degree in visual arts in 2001 then when he realized that “something strange was happening.”

Only until one day in 2013 was Babic given a chance to stage an exhibition by someone from his hometown. He chose to portray children with disabilities and entitled the painting displaying human endurance and dedication “Restart”.

Babic’s struggle also became the theme of a film, also called “Restart”, directed by Dejan Petrovic. But apart from the exhibition and the movie, Babic would hold painting workshops sponsored by the Association for Disabled Persons twice a week to children and youngsters between eight and 30 from Pozega. He would also do so in Arilje, where he received a similar offer from the organization Impuls.

“Situations like this make you realise that art among people with disabilities is marginalized; they do not have the same chances as other artists,” Dragana Latinovic, a visual artist and an art educator, shared about her student Jelena Jakonic in the same report. The latter, despite her medical condition, is cheerful and full of life, spending her days painting in her northern hometown of Kikinda.

To date, Jelena continues to exhibit works at shows for people with disabilities, including at the first creativity fair for the disabled, which was held in Belgrade late last year. It drew the attention of the director of the Museum of Naive and Marginal Art, Nina Krstic, who selected her works for the exhibition “Art in spiritual exile”.

“Having in mind that I am a disabled person, with no art school education, the question of my reliability was brought up – would I be able to do it?” Milenkovic also used to ask herself. “But my mentor convinced them that I am persistent, which made the filming possible,” she added in the very report.

“People with disabilities have various talents, but there are many areas where it is hard for them to achieve affirmation and become visible. This is especially the case in dramatic arts, among actors, directors, where there are no disabled people as far as I know.”

“People with disabilities are rarely shown in a positive context, and mostly as part of stories that deal with social issues. Sometimes sensational headlines glorify the courage of individuals with disabilities, but there is no continuity,” ~ Ruzica Skrbic


Video taken from the YouTube Channel of John Leslie