Tag Archives: Metro Manila

Filipino PWDs this February 2019

Had there been persons with disabilities who took advantage of the early registration?

The latest data that The PWD Forum could find was from a report in February 7. A total of 760,530 incoming kindergarten, and grades 1, 7 and 11 had preregistered in public schools across the country for School Year 2019 to 2020—11 days  after the Department of Education (DepEd) announced the Early Registration Module of the Learner Information System (LIS).

About 215,363 came from Region 4-A or Calabarzon (Cavite, Laguna, Batangas, Rizal and Quezon), 127,285 from the National Capital Region (Metro Manila), 69,257 from Region 8 (Eastern Visayas), and 64,972 from Region 10 (Northern Mindanao).

In 2010, most of the persons with disabilities in the country are in Region IV-A.

In any case, the secretary of the Department of Health has agreed that students should be made to understand mental health conditions.

Dapat pinapakilala na itong pagtanggal sa stigma sa eskuwelahan pa lamang para yung mga bata maintindihan na may ganitong mental health conditions na kailangan maintindihan at tugunan ng tama at hindi ibig sabihin ay hopeless case na yung kondisyon,” he has said in the report.

Letting PWDs study alongside non-PWDs has been one of the things I aimed for when I started this blog. I have no doubts that this will help everyone just like what it has done to Palestinian artist Mohamed Dalo; Czech athletes Jiří Ježek, Martin Kovář, Běla Hlaváčková, and Petra Kurková; and Bahamians Townsely Roberts and Gary Russell.

If PWDs and non-PWDs study together, as I have argued when The PWD Forum turned four, there would be no need to build exclusive educational institutions. Even PWDs can finish degrees: Maricel Apatan, Marc Joseph EscoraSafiya Mundus, Arnel Navales Aba, and Godfrey Esperanzate Taberna. We just have to believe.

Apparently, not everyone is willing to give PWDs a chance. The JCSGO Christian Academy has been alleged in a report to have discriminated an incoming third grade student with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD).

Under education for all, wala tayo dapat tinatanggihan ang bata na mag-aral, anuman ang kanyang maging kalagayan. Kailangan nating mabigyan ng pantay na karapatan ang lahat ng bata para makapag-aral.” ~ DepEd National Capital Region Director Willie Cabral

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Transporting healthcare

Aside from having to afford healthcare, persons with disabilities in the Philippines also have to struggle with transportation expenses to experience it.

The Senate has passed on third and final reading the Senate Bill No. 1391 last July 30. It sought to amend Republic Act No. 7277, otherwise known as the Magna Carta for Persons with Disability, and provide mandatory coverage from the Philippine Health Insurance Corporation. The House of Representatives, on the other hand, has approved on second reading its own version—the House Bill No. 8014–on September 5.

If finally signed into law, the PhilHealth will be required to develop exclusive packages for PWDs, taking into account their specific health and development needs. The 1.6 million PWDs in the country today won’t have to worry when they have to go to hospitals.

That is, if they could go to hospitals.

The mininum fare in public utility jeepneys (PUJs) as of February 8, 2017 is P6.50 while the minimum fare in public utility buses (PUBs) varies: P8.00 is the minimum for the ordinary buses since March 29, 2011 while P9.50 is the minimum fare for the air-conditioned ones. Both groups of transport vehicles are clamoring for a fare hike, though, citing the continuous increase of oil prices.

But “running mostly on diesel engines, [PUJs] are polluting and inefficient for city transportation,” cited in a report. “Passengers have little comfort and virtually no security or safety,” it was further noted, and “there is probably not a single jeepney plying the streets of Metro Manila that can pass even a fraction of safety necessities that every automobile must follow.”

So would the bills really help PWDs? The PWD Forum thinks it would if the current transportation woes would be addressed. Most PWDs come from the low-income class that the means to go to a hospital is important, too.

“Currently, only P2P buses are considered accessible to us. There is also a limited number and limited time for us to avail of such services. This is unfair compared to those without disabilities.” ~ Abner Manlapaz

Video taken from the YouTube Channel of the ABS-CBN News

Note: Currently, PWDs can avail medicine and hospitalization discounts at the same level as senior citizens for as long as they are certified as such and carry PWD cards issued by local governments.

Accessibility and more

Local government units (LGUs) in the Philippines have been doing what they can for persons with disabilities (PWDs) in the country.

In Antique, for instance, the Provincial Disability Affairs Office (PDAO) in Antique has held an accessibility audit in the establishments and schools in the city. It was headed by Paolo Castillo who visited the Eagles Hotel, Land Bank of the Philippines, Special Education and Development Antique Integrated School, Antique Christian Center Incorporated, and Advance Central College together with the Association of the Municipal Engineers of Antique, Department of Public Works and Highways (DPWH), Department of Interior and Local Government (DILG).

In Marikina City, on the other hand, Vice Mayor Jose Cadiz has worked on a software so that PWDs can be picked up from specific points in the locality.

It also launched a PWD-friendly tricycle–a first of its kind in the Philippines—which is inspired by the units in Tokyo and Hong Kong. The tricycle has a larger space that can accommodate a passenger in a wheelchair and three persons more. It also has a ramp and straps to easily draw the passenger into the vehicle while securing the wheelchair on board.

The city government has one unit only, though. It was hoping the private sector will contribute in producing more units. The so-called PWD-friendly tricycle will cost P10,000 more than a regular tricycle but there will be no terminal membership fee of P50,000 anymore since the units do not have to be parked in a terminal.

“We are not fighting for pity. What we are asking is for them to respect our rights regardless of our disabilities. Because, in a way, we are all equal.” ~ Charito Manglapus

Video taken from the YouTube Channel of Rappler

In the Face of Calamities

Children with disabilities in the Philippines—there are 5.1 million of them to date—are the most vulnerable if there happen to be a calamity or an emergency in the country. They wouldn’t be able to flee; around 1.5 million need assistive devices. They wouldn’t be able to go back to school immediately and they wouldn’t be able to subsist in the sanitation conditions in evacuation centers.1

So, Dr. Renato Solidum Jr., Undersecretary for Disaster Risk Reduction of the Department of Science and Technology, proposed to carry out continuing education and preparation on disaster management in all levels especially those in the most vulnerable groups. He encouraged developing “disaster imagination” to bring about people’s resolve to prepare for any disaster and “disaster preparedness” as a way a life for every Filipino.

The National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council–Office of Civil Defense also endorsed “Lahat Handa,” a training manual that promotes the rights and capacities of children, youth, older people and PWDS.

The ramifications of a typhoon, flood, or fire may linger, said Alex Ghenis of the Berkeley, California-based World Institute on Disability. These may disrupt access to caregivers, assistive devices and medical supplies. A person with a mobility impairment might be less able to escape a storm on their own while a person with a visual or hearing impairment might not receive appropriate evacuation notices. PWDs, therefore, even they have mostly been ignored in scientific literature and policy, will be the most vulnerable during calamities because of falling buildings and environmental pollution.

Good thing, someone has thought of sign language gestures for words like typhoon, storm surge and signal numbers in 2013. Some waterside villages in Tacloban have also planned to raise flags and made announcements over megaphones to alert the deaf and the visually impaired, respectively.

The PWD Forum also hopes that closed captioning will be added to television broadcasts soon. For, as of now, research director Perpi Tiongson of the Oscar M. Lopez Center in Manila has observed that the standard version of Filipino sign language isn’t required to be taught at schools for the deaf yet.

“Some of the children with disabilities wouldn’t be able to duck, cover and hold under tables, so they should identify the safest area in the room, where no debris would fall on them. If they use wheelchairs, they should fix it to ensure stability, and everyone should be informed of their buildings’ respective evacuation routes. They should also pinpoint the safe parts of a building in case of an earthquake.” ~ Dr. Renato Solidum Jr.

1This was noted by Lotta Sylwander, country representative of United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF), during the “Emergency Preparedness Forum for Children and Youth with Disabilities.”

2Typhoons could form if the temperature is above 280C (82.40F).

3The figure was from a report of the British Broadcasting Corporation.

Notes:

  • Among of the natural disasters that had happened in the Philippines are the Bohol earthquake, (October 15, 2013), Typhoon Bopha (December 3, 2012), Pantukan landslide (January 5, 2012), Tropical Storm Washi (December 2011), Typhoon Fengshen (June 20-23, 2008), Tropical Cyclone Durian (November 25, 2006), Guinsaugon landslide (February 17, 2006), and Tropical Depression Winnie (November 2004).
  • The Office of the Civil Defense (OCD) in Western Visayas headed by Melissa Banias of the Capability Building Section has trained more or less 700 individuals from the 14 vulnerable or basic sectors that were identified by the National Anti-Poverty Commission (NAPC) on the Philippine DRRM system, different kinds of natural and human-induced hazards, and DRRM applications. They are composed of volunteer groups, persons with disability, farmers, fisherfolk, rebel returnees, and Indigenous Peoples (IP), among others.
  • The Philippines is prone to earthquakes, tsunamis, typhoons, landslides, storms, cyclones, and depressions simply because it is located just above the equator, where the country faces the western Pacific waters with 280C (82.40F) temperature2. Its hillsides are denuded of forests and it rests on the so-called volcano Ring of Fire.

A lot of Filipinos live on coastal islands, too. The Super Typhoon Haiyan reached 23 feet (7 meters) upon its surge. It rolled over the low-lying parts of Leyte, causing death to more than 10,000 people3.

Video taken from the YouTube Channel of Edison Jared

UPDATE (October 2, 2018): On average, more than 1,000 lives are lost every year in the Philippines, with typhoons accounting for 74 percent of the fatalities, 62 percent of the total damages, and 70 percent of agricultural damages, according to the World Bank.

Source: GMA News Online