Tag Archives: English

Israel

In Israel, persons with disabilities (PWDs) are given “financial’ importance.

They are treated as “work disabled persons” since their earning capacity was reduced due to a work-related injury. They are “paid” every 28th of the month through their respective bank accounts or to the kibbutz or cooperative moshav. The maximum work disability pension per month is NIS 32,8391, and would change every January 1st of the succeeding year in accordance with changes in the Consumer Price Index.

Israel has also established a commission—the Laron Committee—to “examine the integration of disabled people into the job market. And through its recommendations, the National Insurance Law was amended! Among of the points had been about the overall amount received from working and from pension vis-à-vis the amount received from pension alone: income shall increase the more a PWD earns from working. In case the PWD has to stop from working, though, the latter will still receive the disability pension as he or she did before without additional examinations.

Anyone receiving a general disability pension, attendance allowance, benefit for disabled child, mobility allowance, compensation for victims of ringworm, or compensation to polio victims from the National Insurance Institute (NII) is entitled to receive a “disability card.” It can be issued according to the PWD’s language preference—in either Hebrew or English—and can be used for seven years.

The NII will also be the one to determine the degree of disability of a PWD. For instance, if the doctor established an impairment involving the back and an impairment involving the leg, 20% will be allotted   for the back impairment while 8% for the leg impairment for a total of 28%.

“When speaking of disabilities, the blind and their needs are most often used as an example. It is deceivingly simplistic since accessibility is something most of the population can benefit from.” ~ Marcus Österberg

1 As of Jan 01, 2014

Video taken from the YouTube Channel of ערוץ של נציבות שוויון זכויות לאנשים עם מוגבלות

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SPED for All

Special education (SPED) refers to classroom or private instruction involving techniques and exercises for persons with disabilities (PWDs) whose learning needs cannot be met by the standard school curriculum.

Its inclusion in the United States started after the Second World War. Then it was introduced in the Philippines by David Prescott Barrows, an American anthropologist who had established the Insular School for the Deaf and the Blind in Manila (later renamed as School for the Deaf and Blind).

In the United Arab Emirates, an agreement was signed with the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities in November 2006. There’s also the Federal Law 29/2006 that assures every PWD in the country, and the UAE Disability Act that promises its nationals with special needs of ‘the same rights to work and occupy public positions, special facilities at airport and hotels, access to public vehicles and parking, and equitable access and facilities into all new property development projects,” among others.

It also mandates both public and private schools to accept a child with special needs (SN) who wishes to enroll in them. There would be vocational and rehabilitation centers and every effort would be made to take in special needs students in mainstream educational settings.

One of its emirates, Abu Dhabi, has partnered with the New England Center for Children to establish a comprehensive education program in either English or Arabic. Its fourth largest city, Al Ain, has a sports club that could train PWDs for the Special Olympics.

I still think, though, that integrating SPED in the basic and secondary curriculum is necessary, beneficial, and practicable. I had hinted about that in my first post and mentioned it particularly in the introduction of this blog.

“I discovered early that the hardest thing to overcome is not a physical disability but the mental condition which it induces. The world, I found, has a way of taking a man pretty much at his own rating. If he permits his loss to make him embarrassed and apologetic, he will draw embarrassment from others. But if he gains his own respect, the respect of those around him comes easily.” ~ Alexander de Seversky

 

Video taken from the YouTube Channel of GreatSchools