Tag Archives: Cardiovascular disease

Help in Czech Republic

Established in 2000, the Czech National Disability Council (CNDC) has aimed to advocate, promote and meet the rights, interests, and needs of disabled people in the country, regardless of the type or extent of their impairment. It has collaborated with the state administration and local government at all levels as well as with organizations and institutions working in this field at both the national and regional level.

It is the advisory body of the Governmental Board for People with Disabilities. It is a member of the governing board of the national development programme Mobility for All. It is a member as well of the joint committee for the Programme of Development and Renovation of Public Transport Vehicles, and the two Boards of the Association of Cities and Municipalities.

Aside from those, the CNDC collaborates actively, too, with the Association of Regions of the Czech Republic, the Association of Employers of Disabled People in Czech Republic, and the Trade Union of Employees in Health and Social Service in the Czech Republic.

Comprising it are member organizations, among of which is the ARCUS Cancer Centre that was founded in 1993. It has helped cancer patients and their families since then under the chairmanship of John Koželská, winner of the Olga Havel signatory of the Paris Charter against Cancer.

There are also organizations specifically designed to cater Czechs with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), cystic fibrosis, Charcot-Marie-Tooth, Huntington Disease, chronic diseases, and deafness.

The Czech AIDS Help Society was established in 1989 as a self-support initiative of PLWHIV [people living with HIV]. Through finances from grants, donations, and fees in its own activities, the Czech AIDS Help Society continues to promote HIV prevention and awareness through anonymous and free-of-charge HIV testing; shelter accommodation services to PLWHIV in its own social center, the Dum Svetla (Lighthouse); on-site HIV/AIDS counseling service in Prague and Ostrava; a national toll-free HIV/AIDS hotline; legal assistance to PLWHIV that were discriminated against; and anti-stigmatization campaigns.

The Czech Cystic Fibrosis Organization was founded in 1992 by the parents of the children who has it. Originally, it was called the Club of Parents and Friends of Children Cystic Fibrosis. The parents pass on practical experiences to each other; in early days, the club voluntarily works for several mothers of sick children. It still involved in “active” parents till this day to handle the provision of the patients, and, together with the staff, promote cooperation among the center; inform the public about cystic fibrosis; protect the legitimate interests of the patients; secure funding for the activities of the club; subsidize the necessary equipment;  and support families of CF patients with low incomes financially.

Society CMT, on the other hand, is an association founded in June 1999. Its objective is to defend, promote, and fulfill the interests and needs of those sickened with Charcot – Marie – Tooth, a neurological disorder that affect the nerves outside the brain and spinal cord, in coordination with state and local governments.

Widowed by the American folk singer Woody Guthrie who suffered from Huntington’s Disease, Marjorie founded an association for those with the rare inherited disease as well. It—the Czech Huntington Association—started to set up a self-help organization in May 14, 1991 to “map” the cause of an illness in Bohemia and Moravia characterized by progressive dementia, abnormal posture, and involuntary movements.

To prevent the “diseases of civilization” (e.g. cardiovascular disease, diabetes, asthma, allergy, oncological diseases, epilepsy, multiple sclerosis, severe renal and metabolic diseases, osteoporosis, vertebral diseases, etc.), the Union of Persons Affected by Chronic Diseases in the CR spread its network of 330 organizations in 290 towns and villages in the Czech Republic with its 55,000 members.

Those with hearing impairment, meanwhile, can go to the Czech-Moravian Unity of the Deaf. It was founded in Brno in 1998 and operates in Olomouc, Breclav, Jihlava, Pilsen, and Prague, aside from there. Its aim: unite the other associations for the hearing-impaired in the region to “effectively promote their mutual cooperation.”

This is not to say that Czechs with mental disability are neglected in the country. They are, in fact, encourage to “expand their opportunities in various fields of life” by the Society for Integration of Mentally Disabled Persons (DUHA); “live independently” by the Inclusion Czech Republic; and “take responsibility for their decisions” by the Pohoda (Comfort).

The Association for Complex Care of People with Cerebral Palsy would inform the public everything that has to be learned about the disease. The DEMKA Club would work with the families of PWDs in reacquainting themselves with the rest of the society.

The Czech Paraplegics Association (CZEPA) would protect the rights and interests of people afflicted with spinal cord injury (SCI). The Union for Rehabilitation of Persons with Cerebral Vascular Accidents would look after Czechs sickened with stroke.

Other organizations for PWDs in the country are the Association of Physically Handicapped in the Czech Republic, Association of  Persons with Disabilities and Their Friends, Helping Hand, Home For Me, Assistence O.P.S., Association of Parents and Friends of Handicapped children in the Czech Republic, and Czech Abilympijská Association.

“The only disability in life is a bad attitude.” ~ Scott Hamilton

Video taken from the YouTube Channel of Flux Us

Chronic Illnesses in Netherlands

In 2002, chronic diseases accounted for 88% of all deaths in the Netherlands.

Back then, overweight and obesity has been the culprit. It was even projected that the prevalence of these health conditions would increase in both men and women over the next 10 years.

But overweight and obesity continued to “soar” in the Netherlands; one in 10 people in the country suffered from the aforementioned diseases in 2012. Type 2 Diabetes1, high blood pressure2, degenerative joint disease, and cardiovascular disease3 were still developed; and anxiety, depression and poor mental health grew more common.

Through advances in technology, however, chronic diseases in the Netherlands could now be controlled. Diabetes could be kept in check through various smartphone applications such as the BG Monitor Diabetes, which can keep a photo log of meals; Diabetes in Check, which can scan barcodes on packaged foods to immediately get their nutrition information; and Diabetic Connect, which make connectivity to the larger diabetes community possible.

Speaking of connectivity, mySugr Diabetes Logbook can track meals necessary for HbA1c reading. Insulin dosages and blood sugar measurements could also be logged in Glucose Buddy and OnTrack Diabetes. Children with this chronic illness could benefit, too, from the “simple and intuitive” interface of the BlueLoop as well as with the games and fun illustrations of Carb Counting with Lenny.

High blood pressure, on the other hand, could be regulated by the sound therapy HIRREMTM (high resolution, relational, resonance-based electroencephalic mirroring) using audible tones to reflect the brain’s pattern of electrical frequencies. Also labeled Brainwave OptimizationTM, the non-invasive neurotechnology can correct neural imbalances of the hemispheres in the brain.

Degenerative joint disease cannot be cured; the pain can only be eased and the swelling reduced. Joints with end-stage disease, however, can be remedied with either arthrodesis (fusion of the joint) or prosthetic joint replacement. UW-Madison researchers have also though of inhibiting the activity of cathepsin K and cathepsin S (TRAP) to nurse the disease somehow.

Incidences of cardiovascular disease can also be lessened with CADence™. It is quick, noninvasive, no-needle, and a zero-radiation test to “look” for Coronary Artery Disease (CAD) risk factors in patients by the sound of blood flow in the coronary arteries.

Anxiety could already be confronted with virtual reality nowadays, too. Depression could be treated with Deep TMS [Deep Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation]4 and poor mental health could be improved with telemental health services.

“It’s the repetition of affirmations that leads to belief. And once that belief becomes a deep conviction, things begin to happen.” -Muhammad Ali

 

Video taken from the YouTube Channel of EU CHRODIS

1Type 2 diabetes causes cells to change, making them resistant to the hormone insulin. Blood sugar cannot be taken up by the cells then, resulting in high blood sugar and for the cells to gradually fail.

2Having a large body size increases blood pressure. Excess fat may also damage the body’s kidneys.

3Excess weight may cause the heart to “work harder” to be able to send blood to all the cells in the body.

4Not unlike the technology in a magnetic resonance imaging, TMS works through a mounted helmet that generates an electrical pulse, too. But the patients cycle through two-second pulses followed by 20 seconds of rest for each sequence—called a “Train”—in this method, and is repeated for about 20 minutes. It should be done daily for about six weeks, followed by a three week tapering off period.

Cardiovascular diseases in Serbia

Cardiovascular diseases happen when the heart does not receive enough blood supply—through the coronary arteries—to contract and pump. It is one of the “national health priority areas” in Serbia according to the report of The European Journal of Public Health aside from cancer and mental health.

There’s a possibility that this could be predicted and prevented through mobile technology, though. Patients just have to be monitored through the Health eHeart Study where physicians could develop “robust and accurate models” based on the occurrence of heart disease in people who don’t yet have heart disease. How to slow down the progression of heart disease in people who already have it will also be observed.

The Health eHeart Study is, in effect, “precision medicine.” Participants just have to submit data via a secure online survey. Smartphone technology can also be used to measure a participant’s heart rate, blood pressure and pulse rate. The collated information would be sent back to researchers who can make recommendations to help prevent or treat heart disease.

“I learned at a very young age to appreciate every single day, and I don’t think it’s a gift everyone is given,” Heidi Dohse

Video taken from the YouTube Channel of John Leslie