How SPED is in the Philippines

Educating persons with disabilities in the Philippines seemed to be more ideal than what The PWD Forum expected.

In 2012, the Department of Education (DepEd) has allotted P180 million for its Special Education program. That’s a 56% increase from its budget of P115 million only in the previous year!

It has also opened 69 more SPED centers then—from 276 only–where each one can get P500,000 subsidy from the fund for pupil development activities including training, educational trips, camp activities, sports and other events; procurement of instructional materials, supplies and learning assessment tools; and training of more teachers, school heads and SPED supervisors. Then-Education Secretary Brother Armin Altamirano Luistro has entrusted its implementation to division and regional offices.

The DepEd has continued to ensure providing “the necessary educational interventions for learners with certain exceptionalities through its Special Education (SPED) program.” In the program, there could be (1) a separate class for only one type of exceptionality, (2) a teacher who would travel—at home or in schools—to provide direct and consultative services, (3) a designated place where there is a specialized equipment, (4) a chance for a PWD to receive special instructions from a SPED teacher; (5) a possibility to be either partially or fully integrated, and (6) an opportunity for PWDs, regardless of the nature and severity of their disability and need for related services, to receive total education within the regular education classroom.

So for this school year, there would be 40,642 teachers for the  kindergarten and elementary level, 34,244 teachers for the junior high school, and 356 teachers for the senior high school. It will be charged against the new school personnel positions budget of the Department of Education (DepEd), which was allotted P553.31 billion in total this year

“We believe that special learners deserve special attention and specialized learning tools, thus the increase in funding support.” ~ Bro. Armin Luistro

Video taken from the YouTube Channel of the Leonard Cheshire

Notes:

Partial integration – the PWD enrolled in a special class is integrated with regular children during non-academic activities like work education, physical education, arts, school programs, etc, then gradually integrated in the academic subjects if qualified.

Full integration – the PWD enrolled in a special class is integrated with regular children in all academic and non-academic subjects.

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