Pushing for the PWDs’ education

Educating persons with disabilities in developing countries such as the Philippines calls for money and resources. As it is, many developing countries’ school budgets cannot already cover all of the mainstream students that need to be taught.

The teachers there also do not have any special needs training1. The schools’ buildings may not be wheelchair-accessible or the PWDs themselves do not even have wheelchairs. The books may not be enough for the sight-impaired students to share with their classmates without disabilities and the hearing-disabled students may not have the hearing aid resources they need.

Some developing countries deem PWDs to be cursed and, therefore, should be avoided. Educating them alongside students without disabilities could, therefore, present a problem for the parents of the latter.

But educating PWDs and non-PWDs together could let those with disabilities in developing countries fully assimilate into the culture of where they are. It is invariably “a way of giving disabled and special needs students2 access to an education and helping them become accepted into society as full, participating members.”

It is said that the greatest percentage of PWDs reside in developing countries; approximately 80% are in Africa, Middle East, Asia, the Caribbean, and Latin America. Some of them are among the countries that ratified the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (UNCRPD). This goes without saying that they adhere to inclusion and inclusive education, which is one of the key provisions of the UNCRPD3.

Educating PWDs alongside non-PWDs in developing countries should be considered now so that there will soon come a time that helping PWDs will just come naturally. There would be no need for rules anymore and education for PWDs will cease to be an “unaffordable luxury” or “non-crucial” because of the degree of financial expenditure and human involvement.

Arguably, a lack of education is the greatest disability of all, and these disabled individuals must suffer the deprivations of educational disability along with physical or mental disability.”

1If they do get training, it is based on a special education needs model, where the focus is on separating a PWD from their peers to segregated classes and schools.

2Aside from PWDs, inclusive education also encompasses to heads of households, former child-soldiers, street children, orphans, child prostitutes, and children of war and displacement.

3Article 24 commits State parties to developing an inclusive education system, where disability should not prevent people from successfully participating in the mainstream education system.

Video taken from the YouTube Channel of the ABS-CBN News

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2 thoughts on “Pushing for the PWDs’ education”

  1. I believe that everyone has something good to contribute to the economy. All of us can be somehow involved in the creation of useful stuff, whether it’s a good or a service. The more inclusive our economy becomes, the more prosperous we shall be. So, we should nurture each person’s potential as much as we can through education. Access to education is a basic human right, not a privilege.

  2. As a participant of the Nippon Foundation funded Institute for Disability and Public Policy, the Ateneo de Manila has slowly built and enforced infrastructural commitments to inclusive education. So since about 2014, ADMU has provided for accessible infrastructures for deaf and physically challenged individuals. Much earlier collective efforts made possible the education of a blind person. But inclusion remains limited at the graduate level where the funded program is couched. In this program we’ve included two deaf, and two physically challenged students which produced different levels of awareness from amongst our students about what equal right to education means forming some very meaningful interaction and learnings about SDGs on PWDs, DRR and PWDs etc from within our masters students who have no or limited socialization to these issues.

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